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Amidine



Amidines are a class of oxoacid derivatives.

Additional recommended knowledge

The oxoacid from which an amidine is derived must be of the form RnE(=O)OH, where R is a substituent. The −OH group is replaced by an −NH2 group and the =O group is replaced by =NR, giving amidines the general structure RnE(=NR)NR2.

 

When the parent oxoacid is a carboxylic acid, the resulting amidine is a carboxamidine, and has the following general structure:


Carboxamidines are frequently referred to simply as amidines, as they are the most commonly-encountered type of amidine in organic chemistry. The simplest amidine is acetamidine, CH3C(=NH)NH2.

Examples of amidines include DBU and diminazene.

References

  • International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. "amidines". Compendium of Chemical Terminology Internet edition.
  • International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. "carboxamidines". Compendium of Chemical Terminology Internet edition.
  • International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. "sulfinamidines". Compendium of Chemical Terminology Internet edition.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Amidine". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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