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By-product



A by-product is a secondary or incidental product deriving from a manufacturing process, a chemical reaction or a biochemical pathway, and is not the primary product or service being produced. A by-product can be useful and marketable, or it can have severe ecological consequences.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Major by-products

Animal sources

  • dried blood and blood meal - from slaughterhouse operations
  • chicken by-product meal - clean parts of the carcass of slaughtered chicken, such as necks, feet, undeveloped eggs, and intestines.
  • chrome shavings - from a stage of leather manufacture
  • collagen and gelatin - from the boiled skin and other parts of slaughtered livestock
  • feathers - from poultry processing
  • lanolin - from the cleaning of [[wool]
  • manure - from animal husbandry
  • meat and bone meal - from the rendering of animal bones and offal
  • poultry byproduct and poultry meal - made from unmarketable poultry bones and offal
  • poultry litter - swept from the floors of chicken coops]
  • whey - from cheese manufacturing
  • fetal pigs

Vegetation

  • acidulated soap stock - from the refining of vegetable oil
  • bran and germ - from the milling of whole grains into refined grains
  • brewer's yeast - from ethanol fermentation
  • corn stover - residual plant matter after harvesting of cereals
  • distillers grains - from ethanol fermentation
  • glycerol - from the production of biodiesel
  • grape seed oil - recovered from leftovers of the winemaking process
  • molasses - from sugar refining
  • orange oil and other citrus oils - recovered from the peels of processed fruit
  • pectin - recovered from the remains of processed fruit
  • sawdust and bark- from the processing of logs into lumber
  • straw- from grain harvesting

Minerals and petro chemicals

Other

  • sludge - from wastewater treatment

See also



 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "By-product". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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