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22 Current news of Nagoya University

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'Tricking' bacteria into hydroxylating benzene

15-Jun-2018

Breaking carbon-hydrogen bonds is notoriously difficult in lab chemistry, yet nature does it effortlessly. Now, scientists have used E.coli bacteria to oxidize the C-H bonds in benzene to generate phenol, with a genetically inserted enzyme (cytochrome P450BM3), that originally evolved to target ...

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Water-Soluble Warped Nanographene

Synthesis of a water-soluble warped nanographene and its application for photo-induced cell death

13-Feb-2018

Graphene and its nano-sized little sibling, nanographene, are well known for their remarkable photoelectronic properties. However, biomedical applications are hampered by the insolubility of the materials, especially in water. A Japanese team of scientists has now introduced substituted “warped ...

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2-D tin (stanene) without buckling

A possible topological insulator

23-Jan-2018

Nagoya University-led researchers produce 2D sheets of tin atoms predicted to have exotic uses in electronics. Nagoya, Japan - Sometimes it pays to be two-dimensional. The merits of graphene, a 2D sheet of carbon atoms, are well established. In its wake have followed a host of "post-graphene ...

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Flipping the switch on ferroelectrics

30-Aug-2017

Many next-generation electronic and electro-mechanical device technologies hinge on the development of ferroelectric materials. The unusual crystal structures of these materials have regions in their lattice, or domains, that behave like molecular switches. The alignment of a domain can be ...

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Turning metal catalysis on its head for a sustainable future

30-Jun-2017

The uncertain future of oil feedstocks and environmental pressure are forcing the chemical industry to adapt and find new renewable sources to sustain its activities. Biomass from sources including wood, agricultural waste, and even human garbage, represents a widely available renewable feedstock ...

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Breaking down plastic waste

Organo-ruthenium mediated hydrogenation under mild conditions

30-May-2017

What to do proteins and Kevlar have in common? Both feature long chain molecules that are strung together by amide bonds. These strong chemical bonds are also common to many other naturally occurring molecules as well as man-made pharmaceuticals and plastics. Although amide bonds can give great ...

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New coating surface for superior rust resistance with 'colorless' color

Electrophoretic deposition coats metal with non-ionic polymer

03-May-2017

Polymer chemists at Nagoya Institute of Technology in Japan invented a novel and simple coating process to color metals, leading to higher performance and saving the energy. The method involves a chemical modification to non-ionic polymers and nanotechnology. Electrophoretic deposition is a ...

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Pinpoint creation of chirality by organic catalysts

11-Apr-2017

Researchers at Nagoya University have reported on the development of an organic catalyst that triggers a highly stereoselective 1,6-addition of azlactones to a δ-aryl dienyl carbonyl compound to generate amino acid derivatives in high yields. The generated 1,6-adduct contains two carbon ...

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Record-breaking material that contracts when heated

10-Feb-2017

Machines and devices used in modern industry are required to withstand harsh conditions. When the environmental temperature changes, the volume of the materials used to make these devices usually changes slightly, typically by less than 0.01%. Although this may seem like a trivial change, over ...

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First experimental evidence of 3-D aromaticity in stacked antiaromatic compounds

19-Dec-2016

Aromatic molecules consist of planar carbon-based rings with alternating single and double (π) bonds. These molecules contain 4n+2 (n = 0, 1, 2 ...) π electrons--π electrons are those involved in π bonds--which results in high stability because the π electrons delocalize over the ring structure. ...

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