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202 Current news about the topic carbon nanotubes


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New approach for 'nanohoops' could energize future devices


When Ramesh Jasti began making tiny organic circular structures using carbon atoms, the idea was to improve carbon nanotubes being developed for use in electronics or optical devices. He quickly realized, however, that his technique might also roll solo. In a new paper, Jasti and five University ...


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Smaller is better for nanotube analysis


In a great example of "less is more," Rice University scientists have developed a powerful method to analyze carbon nanotubes in solution. The researchers' variance spectroscopy technique zooms in on small regions in dilute nanotube solutions to take quick spectral snapshots. By analyzing the ...


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Better trap for greenhouse gases


Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels like coal, petroleum and natural gas tend to collect within Earth's atmosphere as "greenhouse gases" that are blamed for escalating global warming. So researchers around the globe are on a quest for materials capable of capturing and storing ...


Realizing carbon nanotube integrated circuits


Individual transistors made from carbon nanotubes are faster and more energy efficient than those made from other materials. Going from a single transistor to an integrated circuit full of transistors, however, is a giant leap. "A single microprocessor has a billion transistors in it," said ...


New nanomaterial maintains conductivity in three dimensions


An international team of scientists has developed what may be the first one-step process for making seamless carbon-based nanomaterials that possess superior thermal, electrical and mechanical properties in three dimensions. In early testing, a three-dimensional (3D) fiber-like supercapacitor ...


Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3D


A group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have managed to print and dry three-dimensional objects made entirely by cellulose for the first time with the help of a 3D-bioprinter. They also added carbon nanotubes to create electrically conductive material. The effect is that ...


Graphene Set to Make Waves in Multiple Markets Due to its Innovative Capabilities and High Performance

Strong characteristics can put graphene ahead of carbon nanotubes in most application segments, finds Frost & Sullivan


Carbon nanotubes and graphene have been competing head-to-head for many of the same applications in recent years. For most applications, the development of carbon nanotubes has been gradually rising as evidenced by patent trends. Nevertheless, graphene has been making drastic progress. In the ...


Physicists precisely measure interaction between atoms and carbon surfaces


Physicists at the University of Washington have conducted the most precise and controlled measurements yet of the interaction between the atoms and molecules that comprise air and the type of carbon surface used in battery electrodes and air filters - key information for improving those ...


Cotton fibres instead of carbon nanotubes


Plant-based cellulose nanofibres do not pose a short-term health risk, especially short fibres, shows a study conducted in the context of National Research Programme "Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials" (NRP 64). But lung cells are less efficient in eliminating longer fibres. Similar to ...


'Microcombing' creates stronger, more conductive carbon nanotube films


Researchers from North Carolina State University and China's Suzhou Institute of Nano-Science and Nano-Biotics have developed an inexpensive technique called "microcombing" to align carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which can be used to create large, pure CNT films that are stronger than any previous such ...


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