My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

Effects of Extraction Solvents and Provenances on Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Activities of Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) Seeds

Abstract   Polyphenol contents and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging activity of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) seed extracts were compared depending on their geographical origin (Tunisia and India: TCS and ICS, respectively) and the extraction solvent polarity. The β-carotene bleaching assay, the chelating ability and the reducing power of the most promising solvent extracts were also assessed. In addition, TCS and ICS extracts were acid-hydrolyzed and the phenolics identified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Seed phenolic contents and antioxidant activity appeared to be accession and solvent dependent. Extraction with 80% acetone led to the highest polyphenol (18.60 and 16.50 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g dry weight (DW)), flavonoid (5.91 and 4.99 mg catechin equivalents (CE)/g DW) and tannin (83.23 and 80.23 mg CE/g DW) contents, respectively for TCS and ICS. DPPH scavenging activity, β-carotene bleaching assay, chelating ability and reducing power were maximal in 80% acetone for both TCS and ICS. HPLC analysis revealed several phenolic compounds in C. cyminum seeds, with p-coumaric (4.83 and 2.33 mg/g DW), trans-2-dihydrocinnamic (1.09 and 1.20 mg/g DW) and rosmarinic (0.70 and 1.04 mg/g DW) acids as major phenolics in TCS and ICS, respectively. Thus, phenolic composition of cumin seeds is also origin dependent. Taken together, our findings indicate that cumin might constitute a rich and novel source of natural antioxidants as food additives in food industry and that acetone 80% would be the most appropriate solvent for seed extraction.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Category Original Paper
  • Pages 1-10
  • DOI 10.1007/s11947-011-0625-4
  • Authors
    • Iness Bettaieb Rebey, Laboratoire des Substances Bioactives Centre de Biotechnologie à la Technopole de Borj-Cédria (CBBC), BP 901, Hammam-Lif, Tunisia
    • Soumaya Bourgou, Laboratoire des Substances Bioactives Centre de Biotechnologie à la Technopole de Borj-Cédria (CBBC), BP 901, Hammam-Lif, Tunisia
    • Imen Ben Slimen Debez, Laboratoire des Substances Bioactives Centre de Biotechnologie à la Technopole de Borj-Cédria (CBBC), BP 901, Hammam-Lif, Tunisia
    • Iness Jabri Karoui, Laboratoire des Substances Bioactives Centre de Biotechnologie à la Technopole de Borj-Cédria (CBBC), BP 901, Hammam-Lif, Tunisia
    • Ibtissem Hamrouni Sellami, Laboratoire des Substances Bioactives Centre de Biotechnologie à la Technopole de Borj-Cédria (CBBC), BP 901, Hammam-Lif, Tunisia
    • Kamel Msaada, Laboratoire des Substances Bioactives Centre de Biotechnologie à la Technopole de Borj-Cédria (CBBC), BP 901, Hammam-Lif, Tunisia
    • Ferid Limam, Laboratoire des Substances Bioactives Centre de Biotechnologie à la Technopole de Borj-Cédria (CBBC), BP 901, Hammam-Lif, Tunisia
    • Brahim Marzouk, Laboratoire des Substances Bioactives Centre de Biotechnologie à la Technopole de Borj-Cédria (CBBC), BP 901, Hammam-Lif, Tunisia
    • Journal Food and Bioprocess Technology
    • Online ISSN 1935-5149
    • Print ISSN 1935-5130

Journal:   Food and Bioprocess Technology
Year:   2011
Publication date:   17-06-2011
More about Springer-Verlag
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE