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22 Current news of Kyoto University

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Breathing new life into dye-sensitized solar cells

14-Jun-2019

Researchers at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences at Kyoto University have made a popular type of dye-sensitized solar cell more efficient by adjusting and updating their structure. Published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS), the team report a series of ...

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An Elastic Puff of Air

Superflexible aerogels are highly efficient absorbents, thermal insulators, and pressure sensors

27-Jul-2018

Airy, Airier, Aerogel. Until now, brittleness has limited the practical application of these delicate solids, which consist almost entirely of air-filled pores. This may now change: Japanese researchers have now introduced extremely elastic aerogels that are easy to process and can be produced at ...

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A new 'periodic table' for nanomaterials

New simulation helps scientists to decide what molecules best interact with each other

25-Jul-2018

The approach was developed by Daniel Packwood of Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and Taro Hitosugi of the Tokyo Institute of Technology. It involves connecting the chemical properties of molecules with the nanostructures that form as a result of their ...

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Twisting graphene into spirals

Researchers synthesize helical nanographene

04-Apr-2018

It's probably the smallest spring you've ever seen. Researchers from Kyoto University and Osaka University report for the first time in the Journal of the American Chemical Society the successful synthesis of hexa-peri-hexabenzo[7]helicene, or 'helical nanographene'. These graphene constructs ...

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Revolutionary new materials for troubled carbon times

Super filters the world can afford

07-Jun-2017

Around 2800BC, the ancient inhabitants of Ur, Mesopotamia made a discovery that was to change civilization. They learned that if they blended copper and tin into an alloy, the new composite material was stronger, more useful, and more valuable than any man-made substance to date. It gave its name ...

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Improving the resolution of lithography

08-Dec-2016

Flow-lithography is a lithographic method for continuously generating polymer microstructures for various applications such as bioassays, drug-delivery, cell carriers, tissue engineering and authentication. A team of researchers in Korea has demonstrated the use of a wobulation technique to ...

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Towards decommissioning Fukushima

'Seeing' boron distribution in molten debris

19-May-2016

Decommissioning the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant just got one step closer. Japanese researchers have mapped the distribution of boron compounds in a model control rod, paving the way for determining re-criticality risk within the reactor. To this day the precise situation inside the Fukushima ...

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How sweet can you get?

Plant-derived sweetener thaumatin becomes 1.7 times sweeter after amino acid swap

25-Feb-2016

A sweeter version of a widely used plant-derived sweetener is on the way. Researchers have found a way to make thaumatin -- one of the sweetest natural sugar substitutes on the market -- even sweeter. "Making natural sweeteners stronger could be a huge plus to the food industry, especially as ...

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New plastic solar cell minimizes loss of photon energy

07-Dec-2015

As the world increasingly looks to alternative sources of energy, inexpensive and environmentally friendly polymer-based solar cells have attracted significant attention, but they still do not match the power harvest of their more expensive silicon-based counterparts. Now, researchers at the ...

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Intractable pain may find relief in tiny gold rods

25-Aug-2015

A team of scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) has developed a novel technique using tiny gold rods to target pain receptors. Gold nanorods are tiny rods that are 1-100 nanometers wide and long. The team coated gold nanorods with a special type ...

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