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22 Current news of Rutgers University

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New device can measure toxic lead within minutes

Researchers create portable lab-on-a-chip that could detect many contaminants

28-Aug-2020

Rutgers researchers have created a miniature device for measuring trace levels of toxic lead in sediments at the bottom of harbors, rivers and other waterways within minutes - far faster than currently available laboratory-based tests, which take days. The affordable lab-on-a-chip device could ...

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'Blinking" crystals may convert CO2 into fuels

Unusual nanoparticles could could be useful for environmental cleanups, sensors, electronic devices and solar cells

21-Jul-2020

Imagine tiny crystals that "blink" like fireflies and can convert carbon dioxide, a key cause of climate change, into fuels. A Rutgers-led team has created ultra-small titanium dioxide crystals that exhibit unusual "blinking" behavior and may help to produce methane and other fuels, according to ...

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How to make it easier to turn plant waste into biofuels

Innovative process to rapidly dissolve plant fibers

16-Jan-2020

Researchers have developed a new process that could make it much cheaper to produce biofuels such as ethanol from plant waste and reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Their approach, featuring an ammonia-salt based solvent that rapidly turns plant fibers into sugars needed to make ethanol, works well ...

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How to convert climate-changing carbon dioxide into plastics and other products

Scientists develop green chemistry based on a natural process

23-Nov-2018

Rutgers scientists have developed catalysts that can convert carbon dioxide - the main cause of global warming - into plastics, fabrics, resins and other products. The electrocatalysts are the first materials, aside from enzymes, that can turn carbon dioxide and water into carbon building blocks ...

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Rutgers-led research could lead to more efficient electronics

07-Jun-2018

A Rutgers-led team of physicists has demonstrated a way to conduct electricity between transistors without energy loss, opening the door to low-power electronics and, potentially, quantum computing that would be far faster than today's computers. Their findings, which involved using a special mix ...

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A 3-D printed shape-shifting smart gel

01-Feb-2018

Rutgers engineers have invented a "4D printing" method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of "living" structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery. The 4D printing approach here involves printing a 3D object with a hydrogel (water-containing gel) ...

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Rutgers-led research could revolutionize nuclear waste reprocessing and save money

A 'molecular trap' for capturing radioactive iodides in nuclear waste

02-Nov-2017

Seeking a better way to capture radioactive iodides in spent nuclear reactor fuel, Rutgers-New Brunswick scientists have developed an extremely efficient "molecular trap" that can be recycled and reused. The trap is like a tiny, porous super-sponge. The internal surface area of just one gram of ...

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Taming 'wild' electrons in graphene

24-Oct-2017

Graphene - a one-atom-thick layer of the stuff in pencils - is a better conductor than copper and is very promising for electronic devices, but with one catch: Electrons that move through it can't be stopped. Until now, that is. Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have learned how to ...

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A sea of spinning electrons

04-Oct-2017

Picture two schools of fish swimming in clockwise and counterclockwise circles. It's enough to make your head spin, and now scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and the University of Florida have discovered the "chiral spin mode" - a sea of electrons spinning in opposing circles. "We ...

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Acting like a muscle, nano-sized device lifts 165 times its own weight

01-Sep-2017

Imagine repeatedly lifting 165 times your weight without breaking a sweat -- a feat normally reserved for heroes like Spider-Man. Rutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have discovered a simple, economical way to make a nano-sized device that can match the friendly neighborhood Avenger, on a ...

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