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25 Current news of Washington State University

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Disposable masks could be used to improve concrete

Mixture using mask materials was 47% stronger than commonly used cement

02-May-2022

With the pervasive single-use masks during the pandemic now presenting an environmental problem, researchers have demonstrated the idea of incorporating old masks into a cement mixture to create stronger, more durable concrete. In a paper published in the journal,Materials Letters,a Washington ...

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Soft X-ray method promises nanocarrier breakthroughs

Before the huge potential of tiny nanocarriers for highly targeted drug delivery and environmental clean-up can be realized, scientists first need to be able to see them

27-May-2021

Currently researchers have to rely on attaching fluorescent dyes or heavy metals to label parts of organic nanocarrier structures for investigation, often changing them in the process. A new technique using chemically-sensitive "soft" X-rays offers a simpler, non-disruptive way of gaining insight ...

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New technology converts waste plastics to jet fuel in an hour

Catalytic process to efficiently convert polyethylene to jet fuel and high-value lubricants

19-May-2021

Washington State University researchers have developed an innovative way to convert plastics to ingredients for jet fuel and other valuable products, making it easier and more cost effective to reuse plastics. The researchers in their reaction were able to convert 90% of plastic to jet fuel and ...

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Lab-made hexagonal diamonds stiffer than natural diamonds

01-Apr-2021

Nature's strongest material now has some stiff competition. For the first time, researchers have hard evidence that human-made hexagonal diamonds are stiffer than the common cubic diamonds found in nature and often used in jewelry. Named for their six-sided crystal structure, hexagonal diamonds ...

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A key to cheaper renewable fuels: keeping iron from rusting

Cheap and readily available element could be used for cost-effective biofuels conversion

21-Aug-2020

Washington State University researchers have made a key first step in economically converting plant materials to fuels: keeping iron from rusting. The researchers have determined how to keep iron from rusting in important chemical reactions that are needed to convert plant materials to fuels, ...

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Catalyst advance could lead to economical fuel cells

04-Sep-2018

Researchers at Washington State University have developed a new way to make low-cost, single-atom catalysts for fuel cells -- an advance that could make important clean energy technology more economically viable. Hydrogen fuel cells are critical for the clean energy economy as they are more than ...

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Designing materials one atom at a time

09-Mar-2018

Washington State University scientists have been awarded $1 million from the W.M. Keck Foundation to develop molecular machines that self-replicate, producing pounds of 100-percent pure material. You read that right. Their research is the first step towards a new paradigm in manufacturing where ...

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New method could open path to hydrogen economy

02-Feb-2018

Washington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently generate hydrogen from water - an important key to making clean energy more viable. Using inexpensive nickel and iron, the researchers developed a very simple, five-minute method to create large amounts of a high-quality ...

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Cheaper catalytic converter meets modern engines

Less platinum needed

18-Dec-2017

As cars become more fuel efficient, less heat is wasted in the exhaust, which makes it harder to clean up the pollutants being emitted. Researchers at Washington State University, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of New Mexico have created a catalyst capable of reducing ...

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Huge carbon sink in soil minerals

09-Nov-2017

A Washington State University researcher has discovered that vast amounts of carbon can be stored by soil minerals more than a foot below the surface. The finding could help offset the rising greenhouse-gas emissions helping warm the Earth's climate. Marc Kramer, an assistant professor of ...

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