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Oxidative mechanochemistry for direct, room‐temperature, solvent‐free conversion of palladium and gold metals into soluble salts and coordination complexes

Noble metals are valued critical elements whose chemical activation or recycling is challenging, traditionally requiring high temperatures, strong acids or bases, or aggressive complexation agents. Using elementary palladium and gold, we demonstrate mechanochemistry for noble metal activation and recycling via mild, clean, solvent‐free and room‐temperature chemistry, leading to direct, efficient, one‐pot conversion of the metals, including spent catalysts, to simple water‐soluble salts, or to metal‐organic catalysts.

Authors:   Jean-Louis Do, Davin Tan, Tomislav Friscic
Journal:   Angewandte Chemie
Year:   2018
Pages:   n/a
DOI:   10.1002/ange.201712602
Publication date:   18-Jan-2018
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