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NASA Curiosity rover hits organic pay dirt on Mars

Since NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars in 2012, it has sifted samples of soil and ground-up rock for signs of organic molecules—the complex carbon chains that on Earth form the building blocks of life. Past detections have been so faint that they could be just contamination. Now, samples taken from two different drill sites on an ancient lakebed have yielded complex organic macromolecules that look strikingly similar to kerogen, the goopy fossilized building blocks of oil and gas on Earth. At a few dozen parts per million, the detected levels are 100 times higher than previous finds, but scientists still cannot say whether they have origins in biology or geology. The discovery positions scientists to begin searching for direct evidence of past life on Mars and bolsters the case for returning rock samples from the planet, an effort that begins with the Mars 2020 rover.

Authors:   Paul Voosen
Journal:   Science
Volume:   360
edition:   6393
Year:   2018
Pages:   1054
DOI:   10.1126/science.360.6393.1054
Publication date:   08-Jun-2018
Facts, background information, dossiers
  • samples
  • building blocks
  • NASA
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