My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

Baker's Yeast Behavior during Vacuum Agitated Contact Drying

Abstract

Drying is considered as an intensive operation that consumes large quantities of energy. Usually, baker's yeast is obtained using freeze drying or fluidized‐bed drying, both of which are considered as expensive technologies. So, exploring other techniques such as contact drying could limit this disadvantage. In addition, no work dealing with contact drying of baker's yeast has been accomplished yet. Therefore, here, the behavior of baker's yeast during vacuum agitated contact drying is presented. The results show that the drying process can be divided into three phases: the pasty phase, the lumpy phase, and the granular phase. The influence of the drying parameters, such as the temperature, the impeller velocity, and the initial mass, was also studied. It was found that the wall temperature and the impeller velocity have a positive effect on the drying kinetics, as their increase allows a reduction in the drying time. Nevertheless, an increase in the pressure level or the initial mass of the product caused the drying time to increase.

The behavior of baker's yeast during vacuum agitated contact drying is studied. The wall temperature and the impeller velocity have a positive effect on the drying kinetics, as their increase leads to a reduction in the drying time, whereas an increase in the pressure level or the initial mass of the product increases the drying time.

<!--Unmatched element: w:blockFixed-->

Authors:   L. Bennamoun, M. Afzal, A. Léonard
Journal:   Chemical Engineering & Technology
Year:   2013
Pages:   n/a
DOI:   10.1002/ceat.201300253
Publication date:   06-Sep-2013
Facts, background information, dossiers
More about Wiley
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE