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Borazon



Borazon, a boron nitride allotrope, is the fourth hardest substance, after aggregated diamond nanorods, ultrahard fullerite, and diamond, and the third hardest artificial material. Borazon is a crystal created by heating equal quantities of boron and nitrogen at temperatures greater than 1800 °C (3300 °F) at 7 GPa (1 million lbf/in²). Borazon is the only substance other than those listed above that can scratch a diamond [1] (although lasers can cut diamond). A diamond will also scratch Borazon.

Additional recommended knowledge

Borazon was first produced in 1957 by Robert H. Wentorf, Jr., a physical chemist for the General Electric Company. In 1969, General Electric adopted the name Borazon as its trademark for the crystal.

Uses and production

Borazon is used in industrial applications to shape tools, as it can withstand temperatures greater than 2000 °C (3500 °F), much higher than that of a pure diamond at 871 °C (1600 °F). Other uses include jewellery designing, glass cutting and laceration of diamonds.

See also

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Borazon". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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