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Doxapram



Doxapram
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-ethyl-4- (2-morpholin-4-ylethyl)- 3,3-diphenyl-pyrrolidin-2-one
Identifiers
CAS number 309-29-5
ATC code R07AB01
PubChem 3156
DrugBank APRD00935
Chemical data
Formula C24H30N2O2 
Mol. mass 378.507 g/mol
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability  ?
Metabolism  ?
Half life  ?
Excretion  ?
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.

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Legal status
Routes Intravenous

Doxapram hydrochloride (marketed as Dopram®) is a respiratory stimulant. Administered intravenously, doxapram stimulates the respiratory rate, leading to an increase in tidal volume.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Mode of action

Doxapram stimulates chemoreceptors in the carotid arteries, which in turn, stimulates the respiratory centre in the brain stem.

Presentation

Doxapram is a white to off-white, odorless, crystalline powder that is stable in light and air. It is soluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol and practically insoluble in ether. Injectable products have a pH from 3.5-5. Benzyl alcohol or chlorobutanol is added as a preservative agent in the commercially available injections.

Uses

Doxapram is used in intensive care settings to stimulate the respiratory rate in patients with respiratory failure.

It is equally effective as pethidine in suppressing shivering after surgery.[1]

Side effects

High blood pressure, panic attacks, tachycardia (rapid heart rate), tremor, sweating and vomiting may occur. Convulsions have been reported. It cannot be used in patients with coronary heart disease, epilepsy and high blood pressure. It is also contraindicated in newborns and small children, mainly due to the presence of benzyl alcohol.

References

  1. ^ Singh P, Dimitriou V, Mahajan RP, Crossley AW. Double-blind comparison between doxapram and pethidine in the treatment of postanaesthetic shivering. Br J Anaesth 1993;71:685-8. PMID 8251281.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Doxapram". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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