My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

"Evolving electronics" could lead to new electrical devices

Scientists at Durham University, UK, have “taught” materials to form electrical pathways in order to solve a simple problem, which could eventually lead to new electronic devices.

Taking their inspiration from nature, where living organisms evolve to perform complex tasks, the researchers trained tiny carbon nanotubes, suspended in a liquid crystal solution, to form new electrical pathways to sort data into two categories.

When varying electrical voltages were applied to the material using a computer programme, the carbon nanotubes changed position within the solution creating new electrical circuits and increasing its ability to solve the task over time.

M.K. Massey and E. Vissol-Gaudin/Durham University

Topics:
More about Durham University
  • News

    'Evolving electronics' could lead to new electrical devices

    Researchers have taken their inspiration from nature to teach materials to form new electrical pathways. They say the finding could eventually lead to new electronic devices. Scientists in Durham University’s School of Engineering & Computing Sciences trained tiny carbon nanotubes, suspende ... more

    The unbearable lightness of helium may not be such a problem after all

    Helium gas may not be on the verge of running out after all. Previous studies had raised concerns that we were getting close to a world shortage of helium, but a new study shows that in many areas of North America, there is the potential for undiscovered quantities of helium to be associate ... more

    Carbon nanotube computing?

    As we approach the miniaturization limits of conventional electronics, alternatives to silicon-based transistors--the building blocks of the multitude of electronic devices we've come to rely on--are being hotly pursued.Inspired by the way living organisms have evolved in nature to perform ... more

Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE