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Cerise (color)



For information about the Marvel Comics character, see Cerise (comics).

Cerise (pronounced /səˈriːs/ or /səˈriːz/ in English and IPA: [səˈʀiz] in French) is a deep to vivid purplish red. There are various shades of cerise.

Cerise (#DE3163)

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Cerise

Cerise
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #DE3163
RGBB (r, g, b) (222, 49, 99)
HSV (h, s, v) (343°, 78%, 87%)
Source BF2S Color Guide
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

At right is displayed the color cerise. The cerise name comes from the French word meaning cherry. The word "cherry" itself comes from the Norman cherise.

According to Maerz and Paul in their Dictionary of Color, the first recorded use of cerise as a color name in English was in 1858.[1] However, it was used at least as early as 1846 in a book of crochet patterns.[2]


Vivid Cerise

Vivid Cerise
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #DA1D81
RGBB (r, g, b) (218, 29, 129)
HSV (h, s, v) (337°, 94%, 89%)
Source Internet
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

At right is displayed the color vivid cerise.

The source of this color is the following website that sells rabbit skins dyed in various colors (see under fluorescent cerise): [1]


Amaranth Cerise

Amaranth Cerise
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #CD2682
RGBB (r, g, b) (205, 38, 130)
HSV (h, s, v) (354°, 77%, 82%)
Source Internet
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color amaranth cerise is displayed at right. This is the color of cerise amaranth flowers.

Note: On the website that is the source of this color, it is mislabeled as "carmine" (a redder color than cerise)--click to right of pink flower where it says "carmine" to see source of color: [2]


Deep Cerise

Deep Cerise
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #DA3287
RGBB (r, g, b) (218, 50, 135)
HSV (h, s, v) (317°, 57%, 62%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color deep cerise. This is the color called cerise in Crayola crayons (see the List of Crayola crayon colors).

This color approximates the color of the interior of a Bing cherry close to the stone (the exterior of Bing cherry is much darker).

The color name cerise has been in use for this color since 1993 by Crayola.


Hollywood Cerise

Hollywood Cerise
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #F400A1
RGBB (r, g, b) (244, 0, 161)
HSV (h, s, v) (320°, 100%, 96%)
Source BF2S Color Guide
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

In the 1950s, a popular brand of colored pencils, Venus Paradise, had a colored pencil called Hollywood cerise which was this color. Before being renamed Hollywood cerise in the 1940s, the color had before that, since 1922, been known simply as Hollywood. [3]

Another name for this color is fashion fuchsia.


Shades of Cerise Color Comparison Chart

  • Cerise Pink (Hex: #EC3B83) (RGB: 236, 59, 131)
  • Cerise (Hex: #DE3163) (RGB: 218, 49, 99)
  • Vivid Cerise (basis for Fluorescent Cerise) (Hex: #DA1D81) (RGB: 218, 29, 129)
  • Amaranth Cerise (Hex: #CD2682) (RGB: 205, 38, 130)
  • Deep Cerise (Crayola Cerise) (Hex: #DA3287) (RGB: 218, 50, 135)
  • Hollywood Cerise (Fashion Fuchsia) (Hex: #F400A1) (RGB: 244, 0, 161)

Cerise in Human Culture

Academics

  • Cerise is the color representing students of the MSc programme in Computer Science and Engineering at the Royal Institute of Technology. [4]

Art

  • Vivid cerise is the color called fluorescent cerise in black light paints (it cannot be called fluorescent cerise here because computers have no mechanism for displaying fluorescent colors). Water based fluorescent paints became available in the early 1960s. Psychedelic artists use fluorescent cerise along with fluorescent magenta, fluorescent chartreuse yellow, fluorescent "blue" (actually fluorescent azure), fluorescent green, and fluorescent red water based fluorescent black light paints to paint fluorescent black light paintings. Such paintings have become popular decorations, displayed as large murals at massive rave dances.

Comic Strips

  • Cerise is mentioned in the User Friendly Comic Strip for June 21, 2007. [3]

Fashion

  • In womens fashion circles, Hollywood cerise is also called fashion fuchsia; it is known as a popular color for clothing, shoes, and accessories, where it is a slightly less saturated hue of pink than shocking pink.

References

  1. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York: 1930 McGraw-Hill Page 192; Color Sample: Page 31 Plate 4 Color Sample J6—Cerise
  2. ^ Crochet Explained and Illustrated, by Cornelia Mee. London: David Bogue, Fleet Street (1846), p. 117.
  3. ^ Maerz and Paul, A Dictionary of Color New York:1930--McGraw-Hill See Hollywood in Index, Page 196 and Color Sample of Hollywood, Page 33, Plate 5, Color Sample K5
  4. ^ Konglig Datasektionen, Statutes, §2.1 Color

See also

  • Fuchsia (color)
  • Rose (color).
  • List of colors
   
Alizarin Amaranth Burgundy Cardinal Carmine Cerise Chestnut Coral Red Crimson Dark Pink Falu red
                     
Fire engine red Hollywood Cerise Magenta (Process) Maroon Mauve taupe Orange-Red Persian red Pink Persimmon Red Red-violet
                     
Rose Ruby Rust Puce Sangria Scarlet Terra cotta Venetian red Vermilion
                 
   
Pink Carnation pink Fuchsia Magenta Salmon Pink Deep Pink Hollywood Cerise Hot Pink Medium Pink Shocking Pink Cherry Blossom Pink Coral Pink
                       
French Rose Lavender Pink Persian Rose Carmine Pink Cerise Pink Fuchsia Pink Japanese Pink Persian Pink Dark Pink Hot Magenta Lavender Rose Rose
                       
Thulian Pink Amaranth Light Thulian Pink Puce Rose Pink Tea Rose Amaranth Pink Brink Pink Cerise Deep Carmine Pink Mountbatten pink Ultra Pink
                       
   
Amethyst Cerise Eggplant Fuchsia Han Purple Heliotrope Indigo Lavender (floral) Lavender (web) Lilac Magenta
                     
Mauve Mountbatten pink Orchid Palatinate Purple Persian indigo Purple Red-violet Rose Thistle Violet Wisteria
                     
  This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Cerise_(color)". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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