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Delisle scale



The Delisle scale (°D) is a temperature scale invented in 1732 by the French astronomer Joseph-Nicolas Delisle (1688–1768). It is similar to that of Réaumur. Delisle was the author of Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire et aux progrès de l'Astronomie, de la Géographie et de la Physique (1738).

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He had been invited to Russia by Peter the Great. In 1732 he built a thermometer that used mercury as a working fluid. Delisle chose his scale using the temperature of boiling water as the fixed zero point and measured the contraction of the mercury (with lower temperatures) in hundred-thousandths. The Celsius scale too originally ran from zero for boiling water down to 100 for freezing water. This was reversed to its modern order some time after his death, in part at the instigation of Daniel Ekström, the manufacturer of most of the thermometers used by Celsius.

The Delisle thermometers usually had 2400 graduations, appropriate to the winter in St. Petersburg. In 1738 Josias Weitbrecht (1702–1747) recalibrated the Delisle thermometer with 0 degrees as the boiling point and 150 degrees as the freezing point of water. The Delisle thermometer remained in use for almost 100 years in Russia.

Thus, the unit of this scale, the Delisle degree (sometimes spelled de Lisle), is −2/3 of a kelvin (or a degree Celsius) and absolute zero is at 559.725 Delisle degrees.

See also

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Delisle_scale". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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