My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

Electro-galvanic fuel cell



  An electro-galvanic fuel cell is an electrical device used to measure the concentration of oxygen gas in scuba diving and medical equipment.

Additional recommended knowledge

A chemical reaction occurs in the fuel cell when the potassium hydroxide in the cell comes into contact with oxygen. This creates an electric current between the lead anode and the gold-plated cathode through a load resistance. The voltage produced is proportional to the concentration of oxygen present.

They are used in oxygen analysers in technical diving to display the proportion of oxygen in a nitrox or trimix breathing gas before a dive. They are also used in electronic, closed-circuit rebreathers to monitor the oxygen partial pressure during the dive.

Electro-galvanic fuel cells have a limited lifetime which is reduced by exposure to high concentrations of oxygen. The reaction between oxygen and lead at the anode consumes lead, which eventually results in the cell to fail to sense high concentrations of oxygen. Typically, a cell used for diving applications will function correctly for 3 years if stored in a sealed bag of air but only for four months if stored in pure oxygen.

See also


Fuel Cells
Types:  AFC | BE | DBFC | DEFC | DMFC | EGFC | FAFC | MCFC | MFC | MHFC | PAFC | PCFC | PEC | PEMFC | RFC | rfc | RMFC | SOFC | ZFC 
Other: Hydrogen Economy | Hydrogen storage | Hydrogen station | Hydrogen Vehicles
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Electro-galvanic_fuel_cell". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE