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Facultative anaerobic organism



A facultative anaerobic organism is an organism, usually a bacterium, that makes ATP by aerobic respiration if oxygen is present but is also capable of switching to fermentation. In contrast, obligate anaerobes die in presence of oxygen.

Additional recommended knowledge

Some examples of Facultative anaerobic bacteria are the Staphylococci (Gram positive), Escherichia coli (Gram negative), Corynebacterium (Gram positive), and Listeria (Gram positive). Organisms in the Kingdom Fungi can also be facultative anaerobic, such as yeasts.

Factors influencing the switch are the concentrations of oxygen and fermentable material in the environment. In brewer's yeast, the Pasteur shift is the observed cessation of oxygen consumption when fermentable sugar is supplied. In a growing culture, the energy "economics" disfavors respiration due to the "overhead cost" of producing the apparatus, as long as sufficient fermentable substrate is available, even though the energy output per mole of fermented material is far less than from respiration's complete oxidation of the same substrate.

See also

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Facultative_anaerobic_organism". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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