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Olf (unit)



The Olf is a unit used to measure the strength of a pollution source. It was introduced by Danish professor P. Ole Fanger; the name "Olf" is derived from the Latin word olfactus, meaning "sense of scent"[1].

Additional recommended knowledge

One Olf is the sensory pollution strength from a standard person defined as an average adult working in an office or similar non–industrial workplace, sedentary and in thermal comfort, with a hygienic standard equivalent of 0.7 bath baths per day and whose skin has a total area of 1.8 square metres. It was defined to quantify the strength of pollution sources which can be perceived by humans.

The perceived air quality is measured in Decipol[2].

Examples of typical scent emissions

Person/object Scent emission
Sitting person 1 olf
Heavy smoker 25 olf
Athlete 30 olf
Marble 0.01 olf/m²
Linoleum 0.2 olf/m²
Synthetic fibre 0.4 olf/m²
Rubber gasket 0.6 olf/m²

See also

  • Sick building syndrome

References

  1. ^ Fanger, O. P.: Introduction of the Olf and the Decipol Units to Quantify Air Pollution Perceived by Humans Indoors. In: Energy and Buildings. 12, 1988, 1-6
  2. ^ Fanger, O. P.: Introduction of the Olf and the Decipol Units to Quantify Air Pollution Perceived by Humans Indoors. In: Energy and Buildings. 12, 1988, 1-6
  • Professor Ole Fanger's page at the Technical University of Denmark, includes curriculum vitae mentioning him proposing the unit called olf.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Olf_(unit)". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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