My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

Paper battery



In August 2007, a research team at Rensselaer (led by Drs. Robert Linhardt, Pulickel M. Ajayan, and Omkaram Nalamasu) developed a paper battery with aligned carbon nanotubes, designed to function as both a lithium-ion battery and a supercapacitor, using ionic liquid, essentially a liquid salt, as electrolyte. The sheets can be rolled, twisted, folded, or cut into numerous shapes with no loss of integrity or efficiency, or stacked, like printer paper (or a Voltaic pile), to boost total output. As well, they can be made in a variety of sizes, from postage stamp to broadsheet. Their light weight and low cost make them attractive for portable electronics, aircraft, automobiles, and toys (such as model aircraft), while their ability to use electrolytes in blood make them potentially useful for medical devices such as pacemakers. In addition, they are biodegradable,[1] a major drawback of chemical cells.

Additional recommended knowledge

The research team includes the post-doctoral fellows: Victor Pushparaj, Shaijumon Manikoth, Ashavani Kumar and Saravanababu Murugesan.


References

  1. ^ [1]
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Paper_battery". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE