My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

Laser light guides micro-particles to their target

11-Jan-2013

US and German scientists have used laser light to guide micro-particles through a solution towards a target. The technique could be applied to transport the particles to specific locations inside living cells, they say. These so-called ‘micro-swimmers’ consist of a polystyrene sphere with one hemisphere coated with a thin layer of gold.

The team used ‘photon nudging’, in which a weak laser light is used to intermittently illuminate the swimmers, to cause body-centred propulsion by photophoresis. The technique also allows adaptive control: the system continuously monitors the 3D orientation of the particle as it randomly rotates through the solution, so the operator can choose to only turn on the swimmer’s ‘engine’ when it is pointing towards the desired target.

Original publication:

B Qian et al, Chem. Sci., 2013.

Facts, background information, dossiers
More about Princeton University
  • News

    Electrons slide through the hourglass on surface of bizarre material

    A team of researchers at Princeton University has predicted the existence of a new state of matter in which current flows only through a set of surface channels that resemble an hourglass. These channels are created through the action of a newly theorized particle, dubbed the "hourglass fer ... more

    New reaction turns feedstock chemical into versatile, chiral building block

    Researchers in the Doyle lab at Princeton have developed a direct cross-coupling reaction to produce nitrogen-containing compounds called 1,2-dihydropyridines, versatile building blocks that are highly useful in pharmaceutical research. The reaction employs a chiral nickel catalyst and an a ... more

    Down the rabbit hole

    Researchers at Princeton University have observed a bizarre behavior in a strange new crystal that could hold the key for future electronic technologies. Unlike most materials in which electrons travel on the surface, in these new materials the electrons sink into the depths of the crystal ... more

More about RSC Publishing
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE