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Antineutron



The antineutron is the antiparticle of the neutron. It was discovered by Bruce Cork in 1956, a year after the antiproton was discovered. An antineutron has the same mass as a neutron, and no net electric charge. However, it is different from a neutron by being composed of antiquarks, rather than quarks. In particular, the antineutron consists of two anti-down quarks and one anti-up quark.

Antimatter
Overview
Annihilation
Devices
Antiparticles
Uses
  • PET
  • Fuel
  • Weaponry
Bodies
  • ALPHA Collaboration
  • ATHENA
  • ATRAP
  • CERN
People
  • Paul Dirac
  • Carl D. Anderson
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Additional recommended knowledge

The magnetic moment of the antineutron is the opposite of that of the neutron. It is +1.91 µN for the antineutron but -1.91 µN for the neutron (relative to the direction of the spin). Here µN is the nuclear magneton.

Since the antineutron is electrically neutral, it cannot easily be observed directly. Instead, the products of its annihilation with ordinary matter are observed.

There are theoretical proposals that neutron-antineutron oscillations exist, a process which would occur only if there is an undiscovered physical process that violates baryon number conservation.

See also

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Antineutron". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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