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Claude Hudson



 

Claude Silbert Hudson (January 26, 1881 – December 27, 1952) was an American chemist who is best known for his work in the area of carbohydrate chemistry. He is also the namesake of the Claude S. Hudson Award in Carbohydrate Chemistry given by the American Chemical Society.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Life and work

Hudson was born in Atlanta, Georgia in 1881. Originally planning to become a minister, he enrolled in Princeton University, but soon his interests changed to science. He graduated from Princeton in 1901 with a bachelor's degree, and earned a Master of Science degreee in 1902. He then went to Europe to study under Nernst and van't Hoff. On returning from Europe, Hudson worked as a physics instructor for a year at Princeton and later at the University of Illinois, earning a Ph.D. in 1907. He later held positions at the National Bureau of Standards and the National Institutes of Health (1928 – 1951), both in Washington, DC.

He was elected to the National Academy of Science in 1927.

Hudson is also remembered for the so-called Hudson's rules, concerning the optical rotation of sugars.

Selected early writings

  • Hudson, C. S. and Garland, C. M. (1908), Tests of a liquid air plant, Urbana, Ill.: University of Illinois
  • Hudson, C. S. (1910), The quantitative determination of cane sugar by the use of invertase, Washington: Government Printing Office
  • Hudson, C. S. and Paine, H. S. (1910), The influence of acids and alkalis on the activity invertase, Washington: Government Printing Office
  • Hudson, C. S. (1910), A relation between the chemical constitution and the optical rotary power of the sugar lactones, Washington: Government Printing Office

Claude S. Hudson Award

The Claude S. Hudson Award in Carbohydrate Chemistry has been given since 1946 by the American Chemical Society. Awardees are listed below.

  • 2007 Pierre Sinay
  • 2005 David R. Bundle
  • 2003 Robert J. Linhardt
  • 2001 Yuan Chuan Lee
  • 1999 Chi-Huey Wong
  • 1997 Samuel J. Danishefsky
  • 1995 Tomoya Ogawa
  • 1994 J. F. G. Vliegenthart
  • 1993 Irwin J. Goldstein
  • 1992 Akira Kobata
  • 1991 Per J. Garegg
  • 1990 Bertram O. Fraser-Reid
  • 1989 Walter A. Szarek
  • 1988 Leslie Hough
  • 1987 Stephen J. Angyal
  • 1986 Gerald O. Aspinall
  • 1985 Hans Paulsen
  • 1984 Laurens Anderson
  • 1983 Bengt Lindberg
  • 1982 Stephen Hanessian
  • 1981 Clinton E. Ballou
  • 1980 George A. Jeffrey
  • 1979 Arthur S. Perlin
  • 1978 Michael Heidelberger
  • 1977 Jack J. Fox
  • 1976 Sidney M. Cantor
  • 1975 Hans H. Baer
  • 1974 Wendell W. Binkley
  • 1973 Roger W. Jeanloz
  • 1972 Derek Horton
  • 1971 Robert S. Tipson
  • 1970 Norman F. Kennedy
  • 1969 John K. Netherton Jones
  • 1968 Hewitt G. Fletcher, Jr.
  • 1967 W. Z. Hassid
  • 1966 Raymond U. Lemieux
  • 1965 C. G. Caldwell
  • 1964 Dexter French
  • 1963 Nelson K. Richtmyer
  • 1962 Fred Smith
  • 1961 John C. Sowden
  • 1960 Roy L. Whistler
  • 1959 W. Ward Pigman
  • 1958 Hermann O. L. Fischer
  • 1957 Julian K. Dale
  • 1956 James M. D. Brown
  • 1955 Kenneth R. Brown
  • 1954 Horace S. Isbell
  • 1953 George P. Meade
  • 1952 Melville L. Wolfrom
  • 1951 William D. Horne
  • 1950 William B. Newkirk
  • 1949 Frederick W. Zerban
  • 1947 Frederick J. Bates
  • 1946 Claude S. Hudson

Further reading

  • Biographical Information
  • The Collected Papers of C. S. Hudson (1946), New York: Academic Press
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Claude_Hudson". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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