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Magnus' green salt



Magnus' green salt
IUPAC name Tetraammineplatinum(II) tetrachloroplatinate(II)
Other names Magnus Green salt
Identifiers
CAS number 13820-46-7
PubChem 24880821
Properties
Molecular formula H12Cl4N4Pt2
Molar mass 600.09
Appearance green solid
Density 3.7
Melting point

320

Except where noted otherwise, data are given for
materials in their standard state
(at 25 °C, 100 kPa)

Infobox disclaimer and references

Magnus' green salt is the chemical compound with the formula [Pt(NH3)4][PtCl4]. This species has been of interest in materials chemistry and solid state physics because of its one-dimensional structure. It consists of a linear chain of Pt atoms separated by 3.25 Å.[1] The Pt(II) centers are also coordinated to four molecules of ammonia and four chlorides, in an alternating manner. It is a semi-conductor.

Additional recommended knowledge

History

The salt was discovered by Heinrich Gustav Magnus in the early 1830's. It was one of the first examples of a metal complex of ammonia. Ammonia species are very common now - they were after all the basis of Alfred Werner's discoveries. MGS has the same empirical formula as cis-PtCl2(NH3)2 ("Peyrone chloride") and trans-PtCl2(NH3)2. These cis and trans compounds are molecules, whereas Magnus' green salt is a polymer.

Preparation

One mixes aqueous solutions of [Pt(NH3)4]2+ and [PtCl4]2-. A deep green precipitate appears. In recent years, it has been possible to generate soluble polymers by replacing the ammonia with ethylhexylamine.[2][3]

References

  1. ^ Atoji, M.; Richardson, J. W.; Rundle, R. E. "On the Crystal Structures of the Magnus Salts, Pt(NH3)4PtCl4" Journal of the American Chemical Society, 1957, volume 79,pp 3017-3020; DOI: 10.1021/ja01569a009
  2. ^ Caseri, W., "Derivatives of Magnus' green salt; from intractable materials to solution-processed transistors", Platinum Metals Review, 2004, volume 48, pages 91-100.
  3. ^ Bremi, J.; Caseri, W. and Smith, P., "A new compound derived from Magnus' green salt: solid state structure and evidence for platinum chains in solution", Journal of Materials Chemistry, 2001, volume 11, pages 2593-2596.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Magnus'_green_salt". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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