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Marine pollution



Pollution
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Air pollution
Acid rain • Air Quality Index • Atmospheric dispersion modelingChlorofluorocarbon • Global dimming • Global warming • Haze • Indoor air quality • Ozone depletion • Particulate • Smog
Water pollution
EutrophicationHypoxiaMarine pollutionOcean acidification • Oil spill • Ship pollution • Surface runoff • Thermal pollution • Wastewater • Waterborne diseases • Water qualityWater stagnation
Soil contamination
BioremediationHerbicidePesticideSoil Guideline Values (SGVs)
Radioactive contamination
Actinides in the environment • Environmental radioactivityFission productNuclear falloutPlutonium in the environmentRadiation poisoning • Radium in the environment • Uranium in the environment
Other types of pollution
Invasive species • Light pollution • Noise pollution • Radio spectrum pollution • Visual pollution
Inter-government treaties
Montreal Protocol • Nitrogen Oxide Protocol • Kyoto Protocol • CLRTAP
Major organizations
DEFRA • EPA • Global Atmosphere Watch • Greenpeace • National Ambient Air Quality Standards
Related topics
Environmental Science • Natural environment

Marine pollution is the harmful effect caused by the entry into the ocean of chemicals or particles. An associated problem is that many potentially toxic chemical's adhere to tiny particles which are then taken up by plankton and benthos animals, most of which are either deposit or filter feeders, concentrating upward within ocean foodchains. Also, because most animal feeds contain high fish meal and fish oil content, toxins can be found a few weeks later in commonly consumed food items derived from livestock and animal husbandry such as meat, eggs, milk, butter and margarine.

Additional recommended knowledge

One common path of entry by contaminants to the sea are rivers. The Hudson in New York State and the Raritan in New Jersey, which empty at the northern and southern ends of Staten Island, are a source of mercury contamination of zooplankton (copepods) in the open ocean. The highest concentration in the filter-feeding copepods is not at the mouths of these rivers but 70 miles south, nearer Atlantic City, because water flows close to the coast. It takes a few days before toxins are taken up by the plankton[1].

Many particles combine chemically in a manner highly depletive of oxygen, causing estuaries to become anoxic.

See also

References

     
    This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Marine_pollution". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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