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Potassium bromate



Potassium bromate
IUPAC name Potassium bromate(V)
Other names Bromic acid, potassium salt; Bromated flour
Identifiers
CAS number 7758-01-2
PubChem 24444
SMILES [O-]Br(=O)=O.[K+]
Properties
Molecular formula KBrO3
Molar mass 167.0005
Appearance white crystalline powder
Density 3.27 g/cm³
Melting point

350 °C

Boiling point

370 °C (decomposes)

Solubility in water 6.91 g/100 mL (20°C)
Hazards
R-phrases R9 R25 R45
S-phrases S16 S53
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for
materials in their standard state
(at 25 °C, 100 kPa)

Infobox disclaimer and references

Potassium bromate (KBrO3), is a bromate of potassium and takes the form of white crystals or powder.

Additional recommended knowledge

It is typically used as a flour improver (E number E924), strengthening the dough and allowing higher rising. It is an oxidizing agent, and under the right conditions, will be completely used up in the baking bread. However, if too much is added, or if the bread is not cooked long enough or not at a high enough temperature, then a residual amount will remain, which may be harmful if consumed. Potassium bromate might also be used in the production of malt barley where the United States FDA has prescribed certain conditions where it may be used safely, which includes labeling standards for the finished malt barley product.[1] It is a very powerful oxidizer (E° = 1.5 volts comparable to potassium permanganate). Bromate is considered a category 2B (possibly carcinogenic to humans) carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).[2]

Potassium bromate has been banned from use in food products in Europe, as well as the United Kingdom in 1990, and Canada in 1994, and most other countries. It was banned in Sri Lanka in 2001[3] and China in 2005. It is also banned in Nigeria and Brazil.

In the United States it has not been banned. The FDA sanctioned the use of bromate before the Delaney clause of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act went into effect in 1958 — which bans carcinogenic substances — so that it is more difficult for it to now be banned. Instead, since 1991 the FDA has urged bakers to voluntarily stop using it. In California a warning label is required when bromated flour is used.

References

  1. ^ Section 172.730 Potassium Bromate, Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption, US Code of Federal Regulations, US Food and Drug Administration
  2. ^ IARC--Summaries & Evaluations: Potassium Bromate (Group 2B), International Agency for Research on Cancer
  3. ^ Bridges Across Borders, Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Potassium_bromate". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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