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Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI)

Aarebrücke
5232 Villigen PSI
Switzerland
Tel.
+4156310-2111
Fax
+4156310-2199

www.psi.ch/

Short description

The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is a multi-disciplinary research centre for natural sciences and technology. In national and international collaboration with universities, other research institutes and industry, PSI is active in solid state physics, materials sciences, elementary particle physics, life sciences, nuclear and non-nuclear energy research, and energy-related ecology. It is the largest national research institute with about 1,300 members of staff, and is the only one of its kind in Switzerland. PSI’s priorities lie in areas of basic and applied research, particularly in fields which are relevant for sustainable development, as well as of major importance for teaching and training, but which are beyond the possibilities of a single university department. PSI develops and operates complex research installations which call for especially high standards of know-how, experience and professionalism, and is one of the world’s leading user laboratories for the national and international scientific community. Through its research, PSI acquires new basic knowledge and actively pursues its application in industry.

More about Paul Scherrer Institut
  • News

    Lighting material of the future

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, researchers have gained insights into a promising material for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The substance enables high light yields and would be inexpensive to produce on a large scale - that means it is practically made for use in large-area ro ... more

    Weyl fermions discovered in another class of materials

    A particular kind of elementary particle, the Weyl fermions, were first discovered a few years ago. Their specialty: They move through a material in a well ordered manner that practically never lets them collide with each other and is thus very energy efficient. This implies intriguing poss ... more

    Recycling carbon dioxide from the ocean

    Paper, tin cans, glass - the world recycles as much as possible. So why not declare the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) a recycling product as well? Liquid fuels based on carbon will continue to play an important role in the future - despite international efforts to reduce them. So it s ... more

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