My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

How do you build a metal nanoparticle?

11-Jul-2017

Computer-Aided Nano and Energy Lab (C.A.N.E.LA.)

This is a structure of a ligand-protected Au25 nanocluster.

Although scientists have for decades been able to synthesize nanoparticles in the lab, the process is mostly trial and error, and how the formation actually takes place is obscure. However chemical engineers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering explains how metal nanoparticles form.

Giannis Mpourmpakis, assistant professor of chemical and petroleum engineering, and PhD candidate Michael G. Taylor conducted the reseach.

"Even though there is extensive research into metal nanoparticle synthesis, there really isn't a rational explanation why a nanoparticle is formed," Dr. Mpourmpakis said. "We wanted to investigate not just the catalytic applications of nanoparticles, but to make a step further and understand nanoparticle stability and formation. This new thermodynamic stability theory explains why ligand-protected metal nanoclusters are stabilized at specific sizes."

A ligand is a molecule that binds to metal atoms to form metal cores that are stabilized by a shell of ligands, and so understanding how they contribute to nanoparticle stabilization is essential to any process of nanoparticle application. Dr. Mpourmpakis explained that previous theories describing why nanoclusters stabilized at specific sizes were based on empirical electron counting rules - the number of electrons that form a closed shell electronic structure, but show limitations since there have been metal nanoclusters experimentally synthesized that do not necessarily follow these rules.

"The novelty of our contribution is that we revealed that for experimentally synthesizable nanoclusters there has to be a fine balance between the average bond strength of the nanocluster's metal core, and the binding strength of the ligands to the metal core," he said. "We could then relate this to the structural and compositional characteristic of the nanoclusters, like size, number of metal atoms, and number of ligands.

"Now that we have a more complete understanding of this stability, we can better tailor the nanoparticle morphologies and in turn properties, to applications from biolabeling of individual cells and targeted drug delivery to catalytic reactions, thereby creating more efficient and sustainable production processes."

Facts, background information, dossiers
More about University of Pittsburgh
  • News

    Printing a better actuator, actually

    One technology uses magnetic fields to generate mechanical work. The other enhances the magnetic properties of 3D-printed materials. Combined, they could lead to efficient, economical production of magnetic actuators used in everything from sensors, robotics, and mechanical devices to power ... more

    In search of a greener cleaner

    Molecular chelating agents are used in many areas ranging from laundry detergents to paper pulp processing to precious metal refining. However, some chelating agents, especially the most effective ones, do not degrade in nature and may pollute the environment. With support from the National ... more

    Safer carbon nanomaterials, by design

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) are a class of engineered nanomaterials that can be used for many environmental applications, including water treatment and contaminant sensing and remediation. While they are prized for their ability to detect, remove, or degrade contaminants in the environment, ... more

Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE