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List of thermal conductivities



In physics, thermal conductivity, k, is the intensive property of a material that indicates its ability to conduct heat.

Additional recommended knowledge

It is defined as the quantity of heat, Q, transmitted in time t through a thickness L, in a direction normal to a surface of area A, due to a temperature difference ΔT, under steady state conditions and when the heat transfer is dependent only on the temperature gradient.

thermal conductivity = heat flow rate × distance / (area × temperature difference)
k=\frac{Q}{t}\times\frac{L}{A\times\Delta T}

This list makes up the data for the smaller list provided in Thermal conductivity.

Material Thermal conductivity

(W·m−1·K−1)

Temperature

(K)

Electrical conductivity @ 293 K

(Ω−1·m−1)

Notes
Diamond, pure synthetic i2,000-i2,500 i293 (Lateral)i10−16 - (Ballistic)i108+ (>99.9%12C)
Diamond, impure ad1,000 a273 i~10−16 Type I (98.1% of Gem Diamonds)

(C+0.1%N)

Silver, pure d406 - f418 - agi429 agi300 g61.35 - i63.01 × 106 Highest electrical conductivity of any metal
Copper, pure d385 - f386 - e390 - gi401 egi293 g59.17 - i59.59 × 106 IACS pure =1.7×10-8Ω•m

=58.82×106Ω-1•m-1

Gold, pure d314 - fgi318 gi300 i45.17 - g45.45 × 106
Aluminium, pure d205 - f220 - egi237 egi293 g37.45 - i37.74 × 106
Brass dg109 - f119 - f151 - g159 g296 g12.82 - g21.74 × 106 (Cu+(37-15)%Zn)
Iron, pure f71.8 - d79.5 - a80.2 - gi80.4 agi300 g9.901 - i10.41 × 106
Cast iron f55 (Fe+(2-4)%C+(1-3)%Si)
Carbon steel f36 - d50.2 - f54 (Fe+(1.5-0.5)%C)
Bronze (f(25%Sn)26) g42 - g50 g296 g5.882 - g7.143 × 106 (Cu+11%Sn)
Lead, pure d34.7 - f35 - gi35.3 gi300 i4.808 - g4.854 × 106
Titanium, pure f15.6 - gi21.9 gi300 g1.852 - i2.381 × 106
Stainless steel a14 - fgl25 a273 - g296 g1.389 - g1.429 × 106 (Fe+18%Cr+8%Ni)
Titanium Alloy g5.8 g296 g0.595 × 106 (Ti+6%Al+4%V)
Granite b1.73 - b3.98 (72%SiO2+14%Al2O3+4%K2O etc.)
Marble b2.07 - b2.94 Mostly CaCO3
Thermal grease, silver-based i2 - i3
Sandstone b1.83 - b2.90 ~95-71%SiO2
Ice d1.6 - e2.1 - a2.2 e293 - a273
Limestone b1.26 - b1.33 Mostly CaCO3
Concrete d0.8 - e1.28 e293 ~61-67%CaO
Glass d0.8−e0.93(g(96%SiO2)1.2-1.4) e(g)293 10−14 - (g)10−12 - 10−10 <1% Iron oxides
Fibre-reinforced plastics g0.23 - g0.7 - e1.06 g296 - e293 g10−15 - g100 10-40%GF or CF
Soil c0.17 - c1.13
Water de0.6 de293 (Pure)i10−6-(Sweet)i10−3±1-(Sea)i1 <3%(NaCl+MgCl2+CaCl2)
High-Density Polymers g0.33 - g0.52 g296 g10−16 - g102
Glycerol e0.29 e293
Wood, +>=12% water h0.09091 - a0.16 - h0.21 - e0.4 a298 - e293 hSpecies-Variable
Low-Density Polymers g0.04 - e0.16 - e0.25 - g0.33 g296 - e293 g10−17 - g100
Rubber (92%) a0.16 a303 ~10−13
Alcohols OR Oils e0.1 - e0.21 e293
Wood, oven-dry d0.04 - h0.07692 - d0.12 - h0.17 hCedar - hHickory
Snow, dry d0.11
Cork d0.04 - e0.07 e293
Fiberglass OR Foam OR Wool e0.03 - d0.04 - e0.045 e293
Expanded polystyrene ad0.033 - (g(PS Only)0.1 - 0.13) a98-a298-(g)296 (g)<10−14 - (g)100 (PS+Air+CO2+CnH2n+x)
Air d0.024 - e0.025 - a0.0262 d273-e293-a300 (N+21%O+0.93%Ar+0.04%CO2)

(1 atm)

Oxygen, pure d0.0238 - i0.02658 d293 - i300 (O2) (1 atm)
Nitrogen, pure d0.0234 - i0.02583 - a0.026 d293 - ai300 (N2) (1 atm)
Silica Aerogel a0.003-i0.004-k0.008-k0.017-i0.03 a98 - a298 Foamed Glass
Material Thermal conductivity

(W·m−1·K−1)

Temperature

(K)

Electrical conductivity @ 293 K

(Ω−1·m−1)

Notes

References

a CRC handbook of chemistry and physics (subscription is required to access the data)
b Marble Institute
c Soil Sci Journals
d Georgia State University - Hyperphysics
e Hukseflux Thermal Sensors
f Engineers Edge
g GoodFellow
h Physical Properties and Moisture Relations of Wood
i Other listings within Wikipedia references (this table may not be cited, pure elements are sourced from Chemical elements data references, otherwise an in-table linked-page must list the relevant references)
j Clarity requires that no reference is to use this letter
k Thermal Properties - Silica Aerogels
l [1] Machinery's Handbook - properties of materials p404]

Heat Conduction Calculator

Thermal conductivity of air as a function of temperature can be found at James Ierardi's Fire Protection Engineering Site

See also

 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "List_of_thermal_conductivities". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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