My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

Empa (Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt)

Überlandstraße 129
8600 Duebendorf
Switzerland
Tel.
+41 58 765 11 11
Fax
+41 58 765 11 22

www.empa.ch

Short description

Empa is an interdisciplinary research and services institution for material sciences and technology development within the ETH Domain. Empa’s research and development activities are oriented to meeting the requirements of industry and the needs of our society, and link together applications-oriented research and the practical implementation of new ideas, science and industry, and science and society.

More about Empa
  • News

    Turning streetwear into solar power plants

    Empa researchers succeeded in developing a material that works like a luminescent solar concentrator and can even be applied to textiles. This opens up numerous possibilities for producing energy directly where it is needed, i.e. in the use of everyday electronics. Our hunger for energy is ... more

    The Transistor out of the Printer

    Empa researchers are working on electronics that come out of printers. This makes it possible to produce the circuits on all sorts of substrates, such as paper or plastic film – but there are still some hurdles to overcome. Imagine being able to easily print electronics on any surface. Toda ... more

    Biofuels and sophisticated materials cycles thanks to bio-templating

    Blue-green algae are among the oldest living creatures on Earth and have perfected the use of sunlight over billions of years. Empa scientists have now equipped these humble unicellular organisms with semiconductor coatings to create mini power plants, which supply biofuels and are photocat ... more

  • Videos

    A water-based, rechargeable battery

    First step to produce a cheap aquous electrolyte for powerful rechargeable batteries: Seven grams of sodium FSI (precise name: sodium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide) and one gram of water produce a clear saline solution with an electrochemical stability of up to 2.6 volts – twice as much as other ... more

Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE