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How seawater strengthens Roman concrete

The ancient Romans had a recipe for concrete that won't corrode in seawater. Scientists are trying to figure it out.

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    How seawater strengthens ancient Roman concrete

    Around A.D. 79, Roman author Pliny the Elder wrote in his Naturalis Historia that concrete structures in harbors, exposed to the constant assault of the saltwater waves, become "a single stone mass, impregnable to the waves and every day stronger." He wasn't exaggerating. While modern marin ... more

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