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Why is Olive Oil Awesome?

Whether you sop it up with bread or use it to boost your cooking, olive oil is awesome. But a lot of chemistry goes on in that bottle that can make or break a product. Take the “extra virgin” standard: Chemistry tells us that a higher free-fatty-acid content leads to a lower grade, less tasty oil. And those peppery notes are thanks to antioxidants that contribute to olive oil’s healthy reputation. Check out the latest Reactions video for more olive oil chemistry, including how to keep yours fresh and how to best use it to give your food a flavor boost.

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