My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

Drinking Water

Companies Drinking Water

FRIATEC AG, Germany

FRIATEC AG Mannheim - founded in 1860 - covering an area of approx. 350.00 m2 - about 1100 employees - turnover 190 Mio € - specialist for corrosion- and wear-resistant materials - industrial activities: plastic products, mechanical engineering and industrial ceramics more

Products Drinking Water

UV/VIS Measurement for Sensitive Measurements, Such as the Analysis of Drinking Water and Beverages

Spectroquant Prove 300 is a robust UV/VIS spectrophotometer especially suitable for analysis of drinking water and beverages more

News Drinking Water

  • Making seawater drinkable in minutes

    According to the World Health Organization, about 785 million people around the world lack a clean source of drinking water. Despite the vast amount of water on Earth, most of it is seawater and freshwater accounts for only about 2.5% of the total. One of the ways to provide clean drinking water is more

  • Heavy charge against water germs

    Removing pathogens from drinking water is especially difficult when the germs are too tiny to be caught by conventional filters. Researchers at Empa and Eawag are developing new materials and processes to free water from pathogenic microorganisms such as viruses Water is life, biology teaches us. Re more

  • Magnetic nanoparticles with ionic liquids for water purification

    In many parts of the world, access to clean drinking water is far from certain. Filtration of large volumes of water, however, is slow and impractical. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new water purification method based on magnetic nanoparticles coated with a so-called more

All news on drinking water

Videos Drinking Water

UV/VIS Measurement for Sensitive Measurements, Such as the Analysis of Drinking Water and Beverages

Just Prove It. Spectroquant® ProveSpectroquant Prove 300 is a robust UV/VIS spectrophotometer for sensitive measurements, such as drinking water and beverages analysis. Prove 300 allows UV/VIS analysis. It also detects automatically reagent tests for secure measurement of sensitive parameters. Furth more

How Much Water Can Kill You?

You may have heard of deadly poisons like arsenic, cyanide and even the devilishly hard to detect polonium 210. But did you know even drinking water could kill you? We had Deborah Blum, Ph.D., author of the totally awesome book “The Poisoners Handbook,” explain how H2O can be deadly in the right ... more

Microbots zoom around water, destroying bacteria

One day, the tiny robot you see here could help clean up contaminated water. In places where potable sources are scarce, they can destroy disease-causing bacteria in its path and unlike conventional disinfectants, the microbots can be removed easily with a magnet. more

White papers Drinking Water

Infographics Drinking Water

Fluoride & Water Fluoridation

This graphic is the first in a series I’m hoping to make on chemicals with potentially undeserved reputations. In it, I’ll look at the evidence and research on each, and try to come to some kind of rational conclusion as to whether or not their bad reputation amongst the general public is deserved. more

The Chemistry Behind Your Home’s Water Supply

We take for granted the water that comes out of the taps in our home when we turn them on – but a lot of work goes into getting it there. Chemistry, too, has a hand in making sure that the water is safe to drink. Here, we take a look at the water treatment process, and in particular the chemicals us more

The Chemistry of Limescale

Limescale is a substance you’ve undoubtedly encountered, be it clogging up your kettle, or building  up on your bathroom surfaces. But how does it get there in the first place, and how do limescale removers work to get rid of it? Those are the questions this graphic aims to answer. more

Publications Drinking Water

All publications on drinking water

q&more articles Drinking Water

  • Polar and a potential drinking water hazard

    In Germany, drinking water supplies are plentiful and generally of a high quality. Drinking water is in Germany most commonly produced from groundwater (69.6 %), with a further 12.4 % being taken from lakes and dam reservoirs. The proportion of drinking water processed from bank filtration is about 7.8 %. more

Watchlist

This is where you can add this topic to your personal favourites

Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE