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Drinking Water

News Drinking Water

  • Pollution cleanup method destroys toxic “forever chemicals”

    An insidious category of carcinogenic pollutants known as “forever chemicals” may not be so permanent after all. University of California, Riverside, chemical engineering and environmental scientists recently published new methods to chemically break up these harmful substances found in drinking wat more

  • Blind spots in the monitoring of plastic waste

    Whether in drinking water, food or even in the air: plastic is a global problem - and the full extent of this pollution may go beyond of what we know yet. Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), together with partners from the Netherlands and Australia, have reviewed conventional more

  • Sustainable clean drinking water solution

    'There are still two billion people in the world without access to clean drinking water,' says Olivier Gröninger, a postdoc in Professor Wendelin Stark’s group at ETH Zurich. These are the people whom the chemical engineer wants to help. Over the past five years, he has developed an inexpensive and more

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Infographics Drinking Water

Fluoride & Water Fluoridation

This graphic is the first in a series I’m hoping to make on chemicals with potentially undeserved reputations. In it, I’ll look at the evidence and research on each, and try to come to some kind of rational conclusion as to whether or not their bad reputation amongst the general public is deserved. more

The Chemistry Behind Your Home’s Water Supply

We take for granted the water that comes out of the taps in our home when we turn them on – but a lot of work goes into getting it there. Chemistry, too, has a hand in making sure that the water is safe to drink. Here, we take a look at the water treatment process, and in particular the chemicals us more

The Chemistry of Limescale

Limescale is a substance you’ve undoubtedly encountered, be it clogging up your kettle, or building  up on your bathroom surfaces. But how does it get there in the first place, and how do limescale removers work to get rid of it? Those are the questions this graphic aims to answer. more

q&more articles Drinking Water

  • Polar and a potential drinking water hazard

    In Germany, drinking water supplies are plentiful and generally of a high quality. Drinking water is in Germany most commonly produced from groundwater (69.6 %), with a further 12.4 % being taken from lakes and dam reservoirs. The proportion of drinking water processed from bank filtration is about 7.8 %. more

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