My watch list
my.chemeurope.com  
Login  

Nickel(II) sulfate



Nickel(II) Sulfate
General
Systematic name Nickel(II) sulfate, hexahydrate
Molecular formula NiSO4.6H2O
Molar mass g/mol 262.85 g/mol (hexahydrate)
Appearance Blue crystals (hexahydrate)
CAS number [10101-97-0] (hexahydrate)
EINECS number *
Properties
Density and phase 2.07 g/cm3 (hexahydrate)
Solubility in water highly soluble
Solubility in ethanol sparingly (hexahydrate)
Melting point decomp. >100 °C
Structure
Coordination
geometry
octahedral at Ni
Crystal structure Monoclinic?
Thermodynamic data
Standard enthalpy
of formation
ΔfH°solid
* kJ/mol
(anhyd form)
Standard molar entropy
S°solid
* J.K−1.mol−1
for the hexahydrate?
Safety data
MSDS ScienceLab.com
NFPA 704
0
2
0
 
EU classification not listed
Safety statements 22-36/37-60-61
Risk statements 22-40-42/43-50/53
RTECS number QR9600000
Supplementary data page
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
Solid
Spectral data UV
Related compounds
Other anions Nickel(II) bromide
Nickel(II) chloride
Other cations Copper(II) sulfate
Cobalt(II) sulfate
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for
materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox disclaimer and references

Nickel(II) sulfate or just nickel sulfate, usually refers to the chemical compound with the formula NiSO4.6H2O. This blue salt is a common laboratory source of nickel. It also occurs as the rare mineral Retgersite. The anhydrous salt, NiSO4, a high melting solid, is also known but is less commonly encountered. These nickel(II) compounds are paramagnetic.

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

Synthesis and structure

Dissolution of nickel hydroxide in sulfuric acid followed by evaporation produces crystals of this salt or the corresponding heptahydrate. X-ray crystallography measurements show that NiSO4.6H2O consists of octahedral [Ni(H2O)6]2+ ions. These ions in turn are hydrogen bonded to sulfate ions.[1] Dissolution of the salt in water gives solutions containing the ion [Ni(H2O)6]2+.

Coordination chemistry

NiSO4.6H2O and related hydrates react with ammonia to give [Ni(NH3)6]SO4 and with ethylenediamine to give [Ni(H2NCH2CH2NH2)3]SO4. The latter is occasionally used as a calibrant for magnetic susceptibility measurements because it has no tendency to hydrate.

Applications

NiSO4.6H2O in combination with boric acid or nickel(II) chloride is used in some electroplating baths.

Safety

Nickel salts are considered carcinogenic.

References

  1. ^ Wells, A. F. (1984). Structural Inorganic Chemistry, Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 0-19-855370-6.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Nickel(II)_sulfate". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
Your browser is not current. Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 does not support some functions on Chemie.DE