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S band



ITU Radio Band Numbers

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

ITU Radio Band Symbols

VLF LF MF HF VHF UHF SHF EHF

NATO Radio bands

A B C D E F G H I J K L M

IEEE Radar bands

HF VHF UHF L S C X Ku K Ka V W

The S band ranges from 2 to 4 GHz., crossing the imaginary boundary between UHF and SHF at 3.0 GHz. It is part of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum. The S band is used by weather radar and some communications satellites, especially those used by NASA to communicate with the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. The 10-cm radar short-band ranges roughly from 1.55 to 5.2 GHz.

Additional recommended knowledge

S band is also used in optical communications to refer to the wavelength range from 1450nm to 1490nm.

In the U.S., the FCC approved Digital Audio Radio Satellite (DARS) broadcasts in the S band from 2.310 to 2.360 GHz, currently used by Sirius Satellite Radio and XM Satellite Radio.

In some countries, S band is used for Direct-to-Home satellite television (unlike similar services in most countries, which use Ku band). The frequency typically allocated for this service is 2.5 to 2.7 GHz (LOF 1.570 GHz).

More recently, the FCC has approved for portions of the S band between 2.0 and 2.2 GHz the creation of Mobile Satellite Services (MSS) networks in connection with Ancillary Terrestrial Components (ATC). There are presently a number of companies attempting to deploy such networks, including ICO Satellite Management and TerreStar.

Wireless network equipment compatible with IEEE 802.11b and 802.11g standards use the 2.4GHz section of the S band. Also IEEE 802.16a and 802.16e standards utilize a part of the frequency range of S-Band, under WiMAX standards most vendors are now manufacturing equipment in the range of 3.5GHz. The exact frequency range allocated for this type of use varies between countries.




 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "S_band". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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