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X band



This article is about the microwave spectrum. For the Super Nintendo and Sega Genesis online adapter, see XBAND.
ITU Radio Band Numbers

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

ITU Radio Band Symbols

VLF LF MF HF VHF UHF SHF EHF

NATO Radio bands

A B C D E F G H I J K L M

IEEE Radar bands

HF VHF UHF L S C X Ku K Ka V W

The X band, ranging from 7 to 12.5 GHz (the 10.7-12.5 portion overlapping Ku band), with a standard downlink band of 7.25 to 7.75 GHz (uplink 7.9 to 8.4 GHz), is part of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum. The term is also used informally to refer to the extended AM broadcast band.

Additional recommended knowledge

The typical local oscillator frequency of an X band LNB is 6300 MHz.

X band is used by some communications satellites and for radars systems. The 3-cm radar spot-band ranges roughly from 5.2 to 10.9 GHz.

X band radar has a variety of types. Some of these types are continuous-wave, pulsed, single-pole, dual-pole, SAR, or phased array. X band radar has various uses in civil, military and government institutions; in roles such as weather monitoring, air traffic control, maritime vessel traffic control, defense tracking, and vehicle speed detection for law enforcement.[1]

X band radar systems have been of great interest in the last few decades. The relative short wavelength at X-band frequencies makes possible high-resolution imaging radars for target identification and target discrimination.

In Ireland, Libya, Saudia Arabia and Canada the X-Band 10.15 to 10.7 segment is used for terrestrial Broadband. Alvarian, Cambridge and Ogier make systems for this, though these are all incompatible. The Ogier system is a full duplex Transverter used for DOCSIS over microwave. The home / Business CPE has a single coax with a power adaptor connecting to an ordinary Cable Modem. The Local Oscillator is usually 9750 MHz, the same as for Ku Band Satellite TV LNB. Two way applications such as broadband typically use a 350MHz TX offset.

Many countries allow 10.000 to 10.500GHz (with often a gap 10.27 to 10.3) for Radio Amateurs. 10.4GHz is proposed for Traffic Light crossing detectors.

See also

  • XTAR
  • Sea-based X-band Radar


 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "X_band". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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