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C band



ITU Radio Band Numbers

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

ITU Radio Band Symbols

VLF LF MF HF VHF UHF SHF EHF

NATO Radio bands

A B C D E F G H I J K L M

IEEE Radar bands

HF VHF UHF L S C X Ku K Ka V W

Additional recommended knowledge

Contents

NATO C band

The C band is that portion of the electromagnetic spectrum between 500 MHz and 1000 MHz.

IEEE C band

The IEEE C band is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging from 4 to 8 GHz.[1].

It was the first frequency band allocated for commercial ground-to-satellite communications. A typical C band satellite uses 3.7–4.2 GHz for downlink, and 5.925–6.425 Ghz for uplink. C band is primarily used for open satellite communications, whether for full-time satellite TV networks or raw satellite feeds, although subscription programming also exists. This use contrasts with direct broadcast satellite, which is a completely closed system used to deliver subscription programming to small satellite dishes connected to proprietary receiving equipment.

C band is highly associated with TVRO satellite reception systems, commonly called "big dish" systems since small receiving antennas are not optimal for C-band systems. Typical antenna sizes on C-band capable systems ranges from 7.5 to 12 feet (2.5 to 3.5 meters) on consumer satellite dishes, although larger ones also can be used.

The 5.4GHz band (5.15–5.35/5.47–5.725/5.725–5.875 GHz) is used for IEEE 802.11a WIFI and cordless phone applications, leading to occasional interference with C band weather radars.

C band variants

Slight variations of C band frequencies are approved for use in various parts of the world.

C-Band variants around the world
Band Tx Frequency Rx Frequency
Extended C-Band 5.850–6.425 GHz 3.625–4.200 GHz
Super Extended C-Band 5.850–6.725 GHz 3.400–4.200 GHz
INSAT C-Band 6.725–7.025 GHz 4.500–4.800 GHz
Palapa C-Band 6.425–6.725 GHz 6.425–6.725 GHz
Russian C-Band 5.975–6.475 GHz 3.650–4.150 GHz
LMI C-Band 5.7250–6.025 GHz 3.700–4.000 GHz

See also

  • communications satellite
  • big ugly dish
  • 4DTV

Notes

  1. ^ Peebles, Peyton Z. Jr, (1998), Radar Principles, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., p 20.
 
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "C_band". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia.
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