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51 Current news about the topic atomic force microscopy

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Developing new techniques to improve atomic force microscopy

The improvements will increase the versatility and the precision of the instrument

30-Jun-2020

Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology have developed a new method to improve the detection ability of nanoscale chemical imaging using atomic force microscopy. These improvements reduce the noise that is associated with the microscope, increasing the precision ...

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Physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

15-Feb-2019

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks directly, but rather by their mutual interactions, which are governed by their outer electron shells. Many chemical processes are based on the ...

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New method measures 3D polymer processing precisely

11-Oct-2018

Recipes for three-dimensional (3D) printing, or additive manufacturing, of parts have required as much guesswork as science. Until now. Resins and other materials that react under light to form polymers, or long chains of molecules, are attractive for 3D printing of parts ranging from ...

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High-resolution imaging of nanoparticle surface structures is now possible

06-Aug-2018

Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), extremely high resolution imaging of the molecule-covered surface structures of silver nanoparticles is possible, even down to the recognition of individual parts of the molecules protecting the surface. This was the finding of joint research between ...

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Splitting water: Nanoscale imaging yields key insights

20-Jul-2018

In the quest to realize artificial photosynthesis to convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into fuel - just as plants do - researchers need to not only identify materials to efficiently perform photoelectrochemical water splitting, but also to understand why a certain material may or may ...

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Individual impurity atoms detectable in graphene

17-Apr-2018

A team including physicists from the University of Basel has succeeded in using atomic force microscopy to clearly obtain images of individual impurity atoms in graphene ribbons. Thanks to the forces measured in the graphene’s two-dimensional carbon lattice, they were able to identify boron and ...

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Perfect Images: A High-Performance Microscope Dangling From Bungee Cords

Patented vibration damping system enables images of highest quality

10-Apr-2018

To produce images of individual atoms, a microscope shouldn't shake. A patented vibration damping system developed at the TU Wien enables images of the highest quality. It is one of the most accurate measurement instruments available today: the high-performance microscope at the Institute of ...

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Strange things happen when a crystal gets split in two

05-Feb-2018

When a crystal is broken along certain directions the atoms reorganize in amazing ways. Researchers in Vienna have watched this happen, and have learned to control it. The remarkable strength of ionic crystals is easily explained at the atomic scale: Positively and negatively charged atoms sit ...

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Three-dimensional Direction-dependent Force Measurement at the Subatomic Scale

15-May-2017

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an extremely sensitive technique that allows us to image materials and/or characterize their physical properties on the atomic scale by sensing the force above material surfaces using a precisely controlled tip. However, conventional AFM only provides the surface ...

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Switching oxygen on and off

15-Mar-2017

Oxygen atoms are highly reactive, yet the world does not spontaneously burn, even though everything is surrounded by this aggressive element. Why? The reason is that normal O2 molecules, are not particularly reactive. At the Vienna University of Technology, it has now been possible to selectively ...

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