04-Sep-2009 - European Chemicals Agency (ECHA)

New public consultation on 15 potential substances of very high concern

The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) has published on its website proposals to identify chemicals as Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC). Interested parties are welcome to comment on these 15 substances within 45 days. The comments will be taken into account when deciding whether the substances will be added to the Candidate List from which substances are selected for authorisation.

Anyone can comment by 15 October 2009, on the 15 proposals to identify chemicals as Substances of Very High Concern. These substances were proposed by EU/EEA Member States and by the European Commission. Comments should particularly focus on the hazardous properties that qualify the chemicals as SVHCs. In addition, parties can provide comments and further information on the uses, exposures and availability of safer alternative substances or techniques, although these aspects will mainly be considered at the next stage of the process which includes a new round of public consultation.

Nine out of the 15 substances are proposed to be identified as SVHCs because of their carcinogenic, mutagenic and/or reprotoxic (CMR) properties, having thus potentially serious effects on human health. Five substances are proposed to be identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic and as very persistent and very bioaccumulative (PBT), having potentially serious negative effects on the environment. One substance is proposed because it is considered both as CMR and PBT.

The names of the substances and the reasons for their proposal as SVHC are (Substance name (CASnumber; ECnumber; Proposed SVHC property)):

Anthracene oil (90640-80-5; 292-602-7; Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic)

Anthracene oil, anthracene, paste, distn. lights (91995-17-4; 295-278-5; Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic)

Anthracene oil, anthracene, paste, anthracene fraction (91995-15-2; 295-275-9; Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic)

Anthracene oil, anthracene-low (90640-82-7; 292-604-8; Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic)

Anthracene oil, anthracene paste (90640-81-6; 292-603-2; Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic)

Coal tar pitch, high temperature (65996-93-2; 266-028-2; Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic; carcinogen, category 2)

Acrylamide (79-06-;1 201-173-7; Carcinogen, category 2; mutagen, category 2)

Aluminiosilicate, Refractory Ceramic Fibres (- 650-017-; 00-8; Carcinogen, category 2)

Zirconia Aluminosilicate, Refractory Ceramic Fibres (- 650-017-; 00-8; Carcinogen, category 2)

2,4-Dinitrotoluene (121-14-2; 204-450-0; Carcinogen, category 2)

Diisobutyl phthalaten (84-69-5; 201-553-2; Toxic for reproduction, category 2)

Lead chromate (7758-97-6; 231-846-0; Carcinogen, category 2; toxic for reproduction, category 1)

Lead chromate molybdate sulphate red (C.I. Pigment Red 104) (12656-85-8; 235-759-9 Carcinogen, category 2; toxic for reproduction, category 1)

Lead sulfochromate yellow (C.I. Pigment Yellow 34) (1344-37-2; 215-693-7; Carcinogen, category 2; toxic for reproduction, category 1)

Tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (115-96-8; 204-118-5; Toxic for reproduction, category 2)

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